Sesame Seed & Peanut Butter Slice : dairy free, refined sugar free.

2 in 1: baked in a slice tin
or rolled into balls - you choose. 

Ridiculously quick to make, this sesame & peanut butter slice is so good we have made it twice this week - because the first batch disappeared overnight. 

The mixture can either be rolled into balls & served raw, or pressed into a slice tin and baked. 

Just a mixing bowl and wooden spoon is needed, and 4 ingredients - although we can't guarantee you will be able to resist licking the bowl!  

The household couldn't decide whether they tasted better raw or baked - so the verdict is delicious either way.

Served with fresh fruit, the crunchy texture of the sesame seed creates a delicious combination.

Served with fresh fruit, the crunchy texture of the sesame seed creates a delicious combination.

Sesame Seed & Peanut Butter Bites

1 ½ cups organic sesame seeds

1 ½ cups organic coconut shards

3/4 cup organic crunchy peanut butter

scant ¼ cup organic coconut nectar (or liquid sweetener of choice) 
 

RAW If making raw balls, lightly toast sesame seeds over low heat in a dry frying pan - stirring frequently as they will burn quickly. Mix all ingredients together in food processor or in a mixing bowl with a wooden spoon. Roll into balls and store in an airtight container.

BAKED If making baked slice, mix all ingredients together in food processor or in a mixing bowl with a wooden spoon. Press into a 20 x 30 cm slice tin lined with baking paper, and bake in moderate (175 C) oven for about 20 minutes or until lightly golden. Allow to cool, then break (or cut) into chunks and store in airtight container. 


What's nourishing
about Sesame Seeds?

Sesame seeds are nutritionally dense little fellows, 

being high in protein (25% of their makeup)

and rich in minerals (especially copper, useful for repair and elasticity).

the+sesame+plant.jpg


They are also jam packed with oil - which although it is high in kilojoules, is composed of sesamin, sesamolin and sesamol which are all rich in antioxidants and Omega 6 fatty acids. In short : it's the good oil.


And it's an oil which is as ancient as civilisation itself.
 

Sesame seeds originated in India and were traded throughout the Middle East (where they are a fundamental mainstay of the cuisine), Africa and Asia many centuries ago.


More recently, they were taken to North America from Africa, in the late 17th century, where they quickly became part of the Mexican cuisine.


This recipe isn't too sweet - in fact you could use less than the scant ¼ cup coconut nectar and simply adjust to your own taste. And it would work equally well with other nut butters, although there is something quite possibly perfect about the delicious combination of peanut butter & sesame seeds. 

We have found there is a world of flavour difference between organic and non-organic sesame seeds - and of course they are nutritionally superior (without dubious pesticides) and kinder to the farmers and the waterways. 

And we love the notion of a recipe which can be served raw or baked - so if you can't decide, you can always make half raw and half baked - keeping everybody happy. 


sesame plant image from here, all other images taken in our kitchen

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